2018 Alumni

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Sheer Ganor

Sheer Ganor

Sheer Ganor is a historian of German-speaking Jewry. Her research focuses on the nexus of forced migration, memory and cultural identities. She is currently working on a book manuscript titled “In Scattered Formation: Displacement, Alignment and the German-Jewish Diaspora.” This study traces the emergence of a transnational diasporic network of Jewish refugees who escaped Nazi Germany and its annexed territories. Sheer received her PhD in history from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2019. During 2019-2020, she holds a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the History of Migration at the Pacific Regional Office of the German Historical Institute. In the fall of 2020, she will join the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, as an Assistant Professor of History.
Ula Madjek-Krupitski

Ula Madjek-Krupitski

Ula earned her PhD in history from UC Berkeley. She holds two master’s degrees, one from Jagiellonian University, Krakow Poland, and the other from UC Berkeley. Ula was a recipient of multiple fellowships, including those awarded by POLIN Museum of the History of Polish Jews, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, and German Historical Institute. Her dissertation is entitled “Mapping Jewish Poland: Leisure Travel and Identity in the Interwar Period.”  It explores the domestic vacation practices of Polish Jews in the 1920s and 30s, placed in the context of larger processes pertaining to identity formation, such as acculturation, belonging, and nationalism.

Raphael Magnik

Raphael Magnik

Raphael Magarik has studied at yeshivot in Israel and New York. He is interested in English Hebraicism, the comparative study of orality and literacy, and black and Jewish diasporas.  He earned a PhD in English with a DE in Jewish studies.

Magarik is currently an assistant professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He has a forthcoming article in the Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies (as well as published articles in Milton Studies and Reformation), and he is revising his dissertation, “Who Narrates the Bible?” into a book manuscript.

Yael Segalovitz

Yael Segalovitz

Yael Segalovitz is a scholar of Comparative Literature; her work spans American, Hebrew, and Brazilian modernisms. Her current research focuses on the international circulation of “close reading” as a reading method in early twentieth century, the dialogue between modernist writers (such as William Faulkner) and New Criticism, and the link between the mental state of attention and modernist reading practices.  She received her PhD in Comparative Literature with a Designated Emphasis in Jewish Studies from UC Berkeley (2018), where she was a Townsend Center Fellow, and a Posen Fellow. At present, she is serving as an assistant professor at the Department of Foreign Literatures and Linguistics at Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel