2017 Alumni

Yosef Rosen

Yosef Rosen

B.A., Yeshiva University M.A in Jewish Thought, Hebrew University Ph.D. Candidate in Jewish Studies, UC Berkeley and the Graduate Theological Union

Before joining the JDP, Rosen attended numerous traditional and innovative yeshivot in Israel. His research focuses both on the history of Midrash and Medieval Kabbalah. He hopes to write his dissertation on poetic and politico-theological aspects of Zoharic literature as situated within a history of late Midrash and Christian hermeneutical and political figurations. At Berkeley, he has taught courses in advanced Talmud, and he is involved in local Jewish adult education.

Hanna Seltzer

Hanna Seltzer

Seltzer focuses on Hebrew and Yiddish literature, specifically on the works of Yehoshua Knaz, Ya’akov Shabtai, S. Yizhar, Dvora Baron, Yossel Birstein and Ya’akov Glatshtein in the framework of theories of narratology and the Chronotope by Bakhtin. She also studies Israeli film, and is interested in examining the ways in which literary and cinematic texts complicate the conventional national Jewish narrative.

Sarah Levin

Sarah Levin

Levin’s research focuses on the Jewish communities of North Africa and the Middle East, and particularly on intertextual dialogue and debate between Jews and Muslims. Her dissertation, “Narrative Remembrance: Close Encounters Between Muslims and Jews in Morocco’s Atlas Mountains,” investigates 20th-century Jewish-Muslim relations in Morocco as remembered through oral traditions by individuals of both religions living today in Morocco and Israel. Because folklore often serves to express intergroup tensions, she argues that it offers a unique framework for addressing issues of boundaries and difference, while simultaneously elucidating the shared cultural experiences of Jews and Muslims. Her analysis of the narratives reveals a complex and diverse intercommunal life in which maintaining religious boundaries involved constant negotiation of closeness and separation, and created an intricate — and sometimes tense — dance between affinity and differentiation.

Eyal Bassan

Eyal Bassan

Bassan is interested in Jewish literatures (biblical, Hebrew, and Yiddish) and in contemporary literary theory. His dissertation focuses on the concept of the non-conflictual. In particular, he explores the paradoxes of non-conflictual moments throughout the highly conflictual history of modern Hebrew literature. Contra the prevalent theoretical tendency to take the model of struggle as a fundamental paradigm, he asks what is at stake conceptually and politically in texts that position themselves beyond the binary of conflict and aim to weaken its import.

His publications include “The Thousand Plateaus of Uri Nissan Gnessin,” in Ot: A Journal of Literary Criticism and Theory (2012); and “Affirmative Weakening: Y. H. Brenner and the Weak Rethinking of the Politics of Hebrew Literature,” forthcoming inRethinking History.